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Blink : The Power of Thinking Without Thinking


Malcolm Gladwell



0316172324
Retail Price: $25.95
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Format: Hardcover, 288pp.
ISBN: 0316172324
Publisher: Little, Brown
Pub. Date: January 1, 2005

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Description and Reviews
From The Publisher:

How do we make decisions--good and bad--and why are some people so much better at it than others? Thats the question Malcolm Gladwell asks and answers in the follow-up to his huge bestseller, The Tipping Point. Utilizing case studies as diverse as speed dating, pop music, and the shooting of Amadou Diallo, Gladwell reveals that what we think of as decisions made in the blink of an eye are much more complicated than assumed.

Drawing on cutting-edge neuroscience and psychology, he shows how the difference between good decision-making and bad has nothing to do with how much information we can process quickly, but on the few particular details on which we focus. Leaping boldly from example to example, displaying all of the brilliance that made The Tipping Point a classic, Gladwell reveals how we can become better decision makers--in our homes, our offices, and in everyday life. The result is a book that is surprising and transforming. Never again will you think about thinking the same way.

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Reviews

Best-selling author Gladwell (The Tipping Point) has a dazzling ability to find commonality in disparate fields of study. As he displays again in this entertaining and illuminating look at how we make snap judgments—about people's intentions, the authenticity of a work of art, even military strategy—he can parse for general readers the intricacies of fascinating but little-known fields like professional food tasting (why does Coke taste different from Pepsi?). Gladwell's conclusion, after studying how people make instant decisions in a wide range of fields from psychology to police work, is that we can make better instant judgments by training our mind and senses to focus on the most relevant facts—and that less input (as long as it's the right input) is better than more. Perhaps the most stunning example he gives of this counterintuitive truth is the most expensive war game ever conducted by the Pentagon, in which a wily marine officer, playing "a rogue military commander" in the Persian Gulf and unencumbered by hierarchy, bureaucracy and too much technology, humiliated American forces whose chiefs were bogged down in matrixes, systems for decision making and information overload. But if one sets aside Gladwell's dazzle, some questions and apparent inconsistencies emerge. If doctors are given an algorithm, or formula, in which only four facts are needed to determine if a patient is having a heart attack, is that really educating the doctor's decision-making ability—or is it taking the decision out of the doctor's hands altogether and handing it over to the algorithm? Still, each case study is satisfying, and Gladwell imparts his own evident pleasure in delving into a wide range of fields and seeking an underlying truth.
Publishers Weekly, Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

 
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About the Author

Malcolm Gladwell is a staff writer for The New Yorker. He was formerly a business and science reporter at the Washington Post.

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Thinking Doesn't Take Much Thinking June 14, 2005
Reviewer: Harvey L. Gardner from White House, TN USA

". . . a pure "Blink" moment, a small miracle happened, the kind of small miracle that is always possible when we take charge of the first two seconds. . ." The valuable lesson Malcolm Gladwell teaches in "Blink" is that we may know all we need to know to make valid decisions in the first two seconds we're faced with a decision. He painstakingly documents why some people follow their instincts and win, while others deliberate and stumble into error. "Blink" teaches a fresh and enlightening way to approach decision-making.


Find Items On Similar Subjects
Outliers: The Story of Success
The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference
A Whole New Mind: Moving from the Information Age to the Conceptual Age

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