Leading Blog



12.01.16

First Look: Leadership Books for December 2016

Here's a look at some of the best leadership books to be released in December.

  Speed: How Leaders Accelerate Successful Execution by Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman
  Killing It: An Entrepreneur's Guide to Keeping Your Head Without Losing Your Heart by Sheryl O'Loughlin
  Your One Word: The Powerful Secret to Creating a Business and Life That Matter by Evan Carmichael
  Win at Losing: How Our Biggest Setbacks Can Lead to Our Greatest Gains by Sam Weinman
  Mastering Civility: A Manifesto for the Workplace by Christine Porath

Speed Killing It Your One Word Win at Losing Rabbit Hole

For bulk orders call 1-800-423-8273


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Build your leadership library with these specials on over 100 titles. All titles are at least 40% off the list price and are available only in limited quantities.


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"A capacity and taste for reading gives access to whatever has already been discovered by others."
— Abraham Lincoln


Posted by Michael McKinney at 05:30 PM
| Comments (0) | Books

11.30.16

LeadershipNow 140: November 2016 Compilation

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twitter Here are a selection of tweets from November 2016 that you might have missed:
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Posted by Michael McKinney at 01:17 PM
| Comments (0) | LeadershipNow 140

11.24.16

Gratitude is Good for You Too

Gratitude

WE KNOW GRATITUDE makes relationships thrive and makes trust possible. Gratitude encourages, clarifies, motivates, includes, and unifies.

When we show gratitude, people feel valued, they know what’s important, they want to do more, and they feel part of something bigger than themselves.

But gratitude is good for you too.

Gratitude puts you in the right mindset to lead. Gratitude and humility are interconnected. They reinforce each other. Gratitude says, “I didn’t do this alone.” French philosopher Andre Comte-Sponville wrote, The narcissistic leader or “the egoist is ungrateful because he doesn’t like to acknowledge his debt to others and gratitude is this acknowledgement.” A lack of gratitude is at the core of narcissism. We alone are not responsible for who we are and what we do and that is the essence of leadership. We are never truly self-sufficient.

In a practical way, gratitude provides guardrails in our life. Gratitude helps us to protect from ourselves. It is amazing how much gratitude plays into avoiding poor behavior and wrong thinking. Gratitude sets a boundary on our thoughts by making us mindful of others. It helps us to avoid going where we should not go because we are more self-aware.

Gratitude requires that we slow down and reflect. Gratitude is the basis of emotional intelligence. It puts other people first. It says you know and you care. While empathy has been found to be essential to leadership, empathy is not empathy if it is silent. It must be expressed.

Gratefulness helps to curb unproductive emotions such as frustration, resentment, and revenge. Studies have shown that it is an antidote to depression. It has the power to heal and move us forward.

It improves relationships and is a remedy to envy and greed. Instead of trying to strive with others we are thankful for what they do. It eliminates a leader’s tendency towards entitlement. Grateful people find more meaning in life and feel more connected to others.

In these changing and uncertain times, gratitude is a leaders ally. Gratitude looks at the long term and doesn’t focus on the present situation. Life is a continuum. Gratitude allows a leader to appreciate where they are and the resources they have at their disposal to face what life throws at them. A habit of gratitude gives us perspective. It doesn’t blind us to the negative but it facilitates a solution.

Gratitude can’t just be something we do is has to be who we are as a leader. More than a behavior it must come from the heart. It must be the mindset we lead from, manage from, and make decisions from. Gratefulness is grounded in reality because ultimately we must realize that everything good in our life is a gift.

Leadership begins and ends with gratefulness.

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Posted by Michael McKinney at 11:34 AM
| Comments (0) | Leadership Development , Personal Development

11.07.16

5 Leadership Lessons: To Pixar and Beyond

Pixar

FROM A PICTURE IN A MAGAZINE, Lawrence Levy was asked by Steve Jobs to become the CFO of Pixar and structure it in a way that investors could understand it. The trick was to preserve whatever it was about Pixar that enabled great stories to happen in the process. And he captures well how that was done.

5 Leadership Lessons
While the nuts and bolts of this story has been told before, Levy creates from his perspective, a very readable account by weaving his own growth along the way. To Pixar and Beyond: My Unlikely Journey with Steve Jobs to Make Entertainment History is a personal story. It's hard to put down. Here are some of the key takeaways:

1  There’s nothing you can do about where the pieces are. It’s only your next move that matters.

2  Corporations are like living creatures. They have personalities, emotions, and habits. The person at the top might seem to be calling all the shots but is often imprisoned in a culture he or she can do little to change. s corporations, succeed, they generally become more conservative. The flames of creativity on which a company is built can easily cool as pressures to perform mount. Success brings something to defend, something to lose. Fear can easily trump courage.

3  I felt really proud of our decision [to give control to the creative team and not the executive team]. We had chosen to truly empower talent, to send a signal to Pixar’s creative leaders that we trusted them. I cannot say this approach would be right for every company. But I can say that whether you’re making bottled water, mobile games, or computer chips, the decision of who has control over the creative elements is among the most important any team will make. Fear and ego conspire to rein in creativity, and it is easy to allow creative inspiration to take a back seat to safety. It is one thing to cite the adage “Story is king.” It is another thing entirely to live by it.

4  The natural tendency in negotiation is to engage in positional bargaining. This means taking a position knowing that it is not a final position, and holding in reserve a backup position. The danger of positional bargaining is that it forces you to think about backup positions, which weakens your conviction in your original position. It’s like negotiating against yourself. Plan A may be your optimal outcome, but inwardly you have already convinced yourself to settle on Plan B.

Both Steve and I had a strong distaste for approaching negotiations this way. We preferred to develop our positions without thinking through a backup… Once Steve decided what he wanted in a negotiation, he developed something akin to a religious conviction about it. In his mind, if he didn’t get what he wanted, nothing else would take its place, so he’d walk away…. The risk, however, was in so overreaching that we would end up with nothing. If we were not going to have a backup plan, we had to be very careful about knowing what we wanted.

5  We can build extraordinary organizations that foster creativity, dignity, and humanity while respecting business disciplines. We just have to be tuned to it; we have to be willing to balance bureaucracy with the depth and subtlety of creative inspiration, and awareness of the human dimension of our endeavors.

We humans do better when we have something to ground us, a deep source from which we can draw wisdom, insight, and inspiration. The goal of that source is to empower us, to bring depth and fulfillment to our lives, to give us the means to soar.
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Posted by Michael McKinney at 08:36 AM
| Comments (0) | Five Lessons

11.01.16

First Look: Leadership Books for November 2016

Here's a look at some of the best leadership books to be released in November.

  To Pixar and Beyond: My Unlikely Journey with Steve Jobs to Make Entertainment History by Lawrence Levy
  Worth Doing Wrong: The Quest to Build a Culture That Rocks by Arnie Malham
  The Mosaic Principle: The Six Dimensions of a Remarkable Life and Career by Nick Lovegrove
  Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist's Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations by Thomas L. Friedman
  Leading the Unleadable: How to Manage Mavericks, Cynics, Divas, and Other Difficult People by Alan Willett

To Pixar and Beyond Worth Doing Wrong Mosaic Principle Thank You for Being Late Rabbit Hole

For bulk orders call 1-800-423-8273


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"It is better to read a little and ponder a lot than to read a lot and ponder a little."
— Denis Parsons Burkitt


Posted by Michael McKinney at 02:02 PM
| Comments (0) | Books

10.31.16

LeadershipNow 140: October 2016 Compilation

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Posted by Michael McKinney at 02:58 PM
| Comments (0) | LeadershipNow 140

10.10.16

Todd Durkin on Leadership & People

Todd Durkin

TODD DURKIN is one of America's top fitness trainers helping people move beyond their perceived limits from the inside out. The principles he uses in his approach to his work are something all leaders can consider and apply. Durkin brings servant leadership to all that he does. He has been motivating others with his Word of the Week (WOW) since 2011 and has now compiled them in a single book, The WOW Book.

His WOW chapter titled Leadership and People is on–target. He writes:

I love studying great coaches. In any sport. And on all levels.

One of those coaches is Dick Vermeil. Coach Vermeil coached three different NFL teams. The Philadelphia Eagles. The St. Louis Rams. And the Kansas City Chiefs.

In 1999, he led the Rams to a Super Bowl championship. He amassed 126 wins in his 29-year NFL head-coaching career. And he was a three-time NFL Coach of the Year. He has positively impacted thousands of men in his coaching tenure.

On this one particular evening in 2013, I had the opportunity to hear him speak to a few hundred fitness trainers/pros at a Perform Better conference in Providence, Rhode Island.

And he was awesome!

Coach Vermeil revealed his “Seven Common Sense Coaching Points” that make the foundation for any team, business, company, or family. In all seven points, there was ONE commonality: PEOPLE.

Without great PEOPLE, there are no great businesses, no great TEAMS, no great organizations, no great families, no great companies, and no great brands.

Coach Vermeil talked about how the most important resource of any company is its PEOPLE: their personal dignity, pride in what they do, and the trust that they have in management.

At the end of every business/calendar year an important and first question a LEADER should ask is:

Do we have better people in our company?

Do we have better people on December 31st (the year’s end), than we did on January first (the year’s beginning)?

Are we better TODAY than we were at the start of the year?

Think about what Ford says in its MISSION statement: “Our PEOPLE are the source of our strength.”

Think about what Hilton Hotels says in its VALUES statement: “PEOPLE are our most important asset.”

YOU are a LEADER of your business, your TEAM, your family, your organization . . . regardless of your title!

Your PEOPLE need to know what to expect.
Your PEOPLE need to be kept informed.
Your PEOPLE need to be trained.
Your PEOPLE need to be challenged.
Your PEOPLE need to be held accountable.
Your PEOPLE need to be appreciated.
Your PEOPLE need to feel that you care about them.
Your PEOPLE need to be recognized and celebrated.
Your PEOPLE need to be LED.
Your PEOPLE need to be able to grow and advance.
Your PEOPLE need your feedback and coaching.
Your PEOPLE need to be LISTENED to and HEARD.
Your PEOPLE need to be TRUSTED, and they must TRUST YOU!
Your PEOPLE must be LOVED and LOVE each other.

Durkin has put together 52 chapters in The WOW Book and each ends with an action step. Good value for any leader.

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Posted by Michael McKinney at 08:26 PM
| Comments (0) | Positive Leadership

10.06.16

The Five Friends Business Summit


Five Friends

You probably have seen the 5 Friends Insights on Business and Life videos.

Now they bring you the Five Friends Business Summit on November 2-3, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. At this business summit you will receive the same high-level, intensive content usually reserved to the Fortune 500 clients of the Five Friends.5 Friends Logo

The Five best-selling authors, Speaker Hall of Fame recipients, internationally-acclaimed business consultants and best buddies are:

Joe Calloway is an expert on branding and competitive positioning and the author of Becoming A Category of One, Be The Best At What Matters Most and the Unlocking Maximum Potential blog.

Scott McKain is an authority how organizations create distinction and author of Create Distinction, 7 Tenets of Taxi Terry and the Create Distinction blog.

Randy Pennington is a business performance expert and author of Make Change Work, Results Rule! and the Results Rule! blog.

Mark Sanborn is an expert on leadership, team building, customer service and change. He is the author of The Fred Factor, You Don’t Need a Title to be a Leader, The Encore Effect, and hosts a leadership blog.

Larry Winget is the “Pitbull of Personal Development.” He is the author of Shut Up, Stop Whining & Get A Life, You’re Broke Because You Want To Be, Your Kids Are Your Own Fault and Larry’s Blog.

Together they will cover:
  • What are You Willing to Do to Get What You Want? led by Larry Winget
  • How to Focus Your Resources to Reach Your Results Goals led by Mark Sanborn
  • How Simplicity and Focus Can Create Customers and Grow Your Business led by Joe Calloway
  • The Four Steps Required to Create Distinction in Your Marketplace led by Scott McKain
  • Turn Intention into Action: Making Changes and Building Your Culture led by Randy Pennington
I’ve seen them all in person and I know any one of them would be worth the price of admission, but all five is a real bargain. Leverage it for your own success.

Go to the Five Friends Business Summit web site and sign up today!

Posted by Michael McKinney at 02:57 PM
| Comments (0) | Miscellany

10.05.16

5 Questions to Ask When Managing in the Gray

Managing Gray

JOSEPH BADARACCO PROVIDES A WAY to resolve the inevitable gray areas we will all face from time to time in Managing in the Gray. It is the core of a leaders work.

Gray areas demand our best judgment. The five questions provide a way to get there. They are “a distinctive way of sizing up gray area issues, analyzing them carefully, grappling with their full, human complexity, and then—and only then—making final decisions.”

Avoid the temptation to skip a question or pick a favorite. “This approach improves deliberation and judgment because the questions complement, correct, and strengthen each other.”

5 Questions to work through the gray of difficult decisions:

What are the net, net consequences?
The critical first step requires thinking deeply putting aside your own self-interest. Don’t oversimplify. That means don’t just think about those things you can put a number to. “Life is a rich canvas, not a cartoon.” Understanding the net, net consequences means thinking in terms of “everything that matters to us as human beings: hope, joy, security, freedom from hazards, health, friendship, and love, risk, suffering, and dreams.” What are we trying to do for people, not to them?

Keep in mind we have a strong self-enhancement bias. We tend to see too quickly. The process is important when working on gray area problems. “How you work on a problem can be as important as what you ultimately decide to do.”

Get the right people in the room. Assign a couple people to play devil’s advocate. Begin by developing a list of things you could do as opposed to what you should do. Then work out the possible outcomes of each possibility.

What are my core obligations?
“When trying to resolve a gray area problem, you have to develop an answer—for yourself—to the question of what your core human obligations require you to do and not do in the situation you face.” In a business situation it is important to take a hard look at the economics but at the same time you need to look past the economics and try resolving the issue like a human being. When looking at a gray area problem you must awaken your moral imagination. Edmund Burke described it as a “reaction to a situation that the heart owns and the understanding ratifies.” Again, make it part of the process.

What will work in the world as it is?
More than what will work. What will work in the world as it is? Don’t let idealistic notions distort your thinking. “If you have serious responsibilities, you must avoid the trap of seeing the world as you want it to be.” “The question asks managers if they are prepared to do what is necessary in this world—to serve the interests of people who depend on them and also protect themselves and advance their own objectives.” The question becomes, “How resilient is my plan and how resilient am I?” Badaracco offers five step to help you answer with eyes-wide-open realism.

Who are we?
This questions guides leaders to see their identities as woven into the fabric of their surrounding communities. “It then encourages them to seek options that will reflect, express, and give reality to the norms and values of the communities to which they belong.” We are social creatures. “It is relationships, values, and norms that make us who we are.” See the problem in context. “When you face a hard gray area issue, you should spend a few minutes stepping back and trying to understand the situation in terms of some of the defining experiences in your organization’s history that matter to you and help you understand what your organization stands for.”

What can I live with?
Not what is best or right, but what you can live with. After all is said and done It is quite possible—even probable—that you will not find a solution. If that’s the case you have to create an answer you can live with. It means “you did all you could, but you’ve only met a minimum standard of acceptability.” And of course, you have to take responsibility for it. “Gray area decisions inevitably reflect and reveal the personal priorities of the person who makes them.” And so these kinds of tough questions push you to reflect on what you can live with. They test competence and character. What are your convictions? Alfred P. Sloan wrote in his autobiography, “The final act of business judgment is, of course, intuitive.”

Badaracco concludes: “Men and women should approach gray area issues as managers and resolve them as human beings.

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Posted by Michael McKinney at 04:09 PM
| Comments (0) | Problem Solving

10.03.16

Richard Koch on Principles

Principles

PRINCIPLES ARE WONDERFUL THINGS, because if they are really powerful they can save us enormous effort and stop us going down dead ends. In science and business there are just a few such principles; but whereas most scientists are aware of the beautiful principles in their field, few business people are guided by principles in their daily work, preferring to rely on methods—the next level down.

Yet as the nineteenth-century philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble.”

To qualify, a principle must be so overwhelmingly powerful that ordinary mortals—such as you or me—can reliable create ordinary results, not through personal brilliance, but just by following the principle carefully and with a modicum of common sense.

Adapted from Simplify: How the Best Businesses in the World Succeed by Richard Koch and Greg Lockwood.

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Posted by Michael McKinney at 08:19 PM
| Comments (1) | General Business

10.01.16

First Look: Leadership Books for October 2016

Here's a look at some of the best leadership books to be released in October.

  Rock Bottom to Rock Star: Lessons from the Business School of Hard Knocks by Ryan Blair
  Simplify: How the Best Businesses in the World Succeed by Richard Koch, Greg Lockwood and Perry Marshall
  Becoming a Leader of Character: 6 Habits That Make or Break a Leader at Work and at Home by James L. Anderson and Dave Anderson
  Small Acts of Leadership: 12 Intentional Behaviors that Lead to Big Impact by G. Shawn Hunter
  Hopping over the Rabbit Hole: How Entrepreneurs Turn Failure into Success by Anthony Scaramucci

Rock Bottom to Rock Star Simplify Art of Community Cheat Code Rabbit Hole

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"A room without books is like a body without a soul."
— Marcus Tullius Cicero


Posted by Michael McKinney at 08:31 AM
| Comments (0) | Books

09.30.16

LeadershipNow 140: September 2016 Compilation

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Posted by Michael McKinney at 03:56 PM
| Comments (0) | LeadershipNow 140

09.27.16

The 10 Laws of Trust

10 Laws of Trust

IN The 10 Laws of Trust, JetBlue Chairman and Stanford Professor Joel Peterson begins by reminding us that “when it comes to building great companies, a leader’s job isn’t to make it to the top of the mountain alone. Instead, the task is to help others reach peaks they want to climb but might not be able to without the help of the leader.” That leaves no room for distrust.

“Trust is a leap of faith rooted in optimism.” It means giving away some control.

Trust levels differ from organization to organization. While trust levels are not fixed, ‘what tends to motivate people within any organization tells you what level of trust you might realistically hope for.” So low-trust organizations rely on fear and high-trust organizations are motivated by duty and love.

Trust Levels

The goal of a leader is to move their organization to the high-trust duty and love end of the spectrum.

Peterson offers 10 steps how to establish and maintain a culture of trust:

1. Start with personal integrity.
Doing what you say you will do. Promise less and do more. On and off the job. “Even if you’re not where you want to be, team members who see leaders working on shortcomings will tend to trust them, and enterprise-wide trust will grow.”

2. Invest in respect.
Respect is how trust is expressed. Listening well signals respect in others. “Honoring those who aren’t present is an ideal way to show respect for those who are.”

3. Empower others.
Trust is a choice. “Mistrustful organizations are preoccupied with keeping people from doing their worst, while high-trust organizations focus on empowering people to do their best.” People will make mistakes but accepting that fact comes with the decision to trust. After sharing a personal story from his childhood, Peterson said, “Being trusted after having failed was indelibly empowering.” That’s when it matters most.

4. Measure what you want to achieve.
What am I being trusted to do? “Trust comes with a scoreboard, with clarity around how results will be measured.”

5. Create a common dream.
Your mission statement should express unique ways people can be respected members of a winning team doing something meaningful. “When people can rally around a common goal, reaching for a summit that’s consistent with their values, they’ll sacrifice together, life each others’ burdens, and do their utmost not to let each other down.”

6. Keep everyone informed.
In low-trust cultures, communication is lacking. You are always communicating so be intentional. “Leaders should avoid the trust-destroying silence, secrecy, and doublespeak so damaging to organizations.”

7. Embrace respectful conflict.
Conflict is always with us. What separates low-trust from high-trust is how we deal with it. Create an environment where the best ideas win not the best presenters. Run toward the fire. “When you chose to ignore or run away from bad news, you’re only doing a disservice to yourself, your colleagues, and your family—and you’re violating their trust in you.”

8. Show humility.
“To be effective, high-trust leaders must see themselves as both vital and dispensable….If you want to be a high-trust leader, you’ve got to be in the center—without being the center.”

9. Strive for win-win negotiations.
Think long-term. It’s an ongoing conversation that either builds or diminishes your reputation. “You’re not obligated to make sure those on the other side get a great deal, but you do want them to walk away feeling respected.”

10. Proceed with care.
People do betray our trust. “But if one grants trust only after carefully evaluating Character, Competence, and Authority, betrayal is less likely.”

Building or rebuilding a high-trust culture is a “patient, one-person-at-a-time, conversation-by-conversation process.” And forgive.

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Posted by Michael McKinney at 12:40 AM
| Comments (0) | Teamwork

09.01.16

First Look: Leadership Books for September 2016

Here's a look at some of the best leadership books to be released in September.

  Managing in the Gray: Five Timeless Questions for Resolving Your Toughest Problems at Work by Joseph L. Badaracco Jr.
  Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade by Robert Cialdini
  The Art of Community: Seven Principles for Belonging by Charles Vogl
 
The Cheat Code: Going Off Script to Get More, Go Faster, and Shortcut Your Way to Success by Brian Wong
  Simply Brilliant: How Great Organizations Do Ordinary Things in Extraordinary Ways by William C. Taylor

Managing in the Gray Pre-Suasion Art of Community Cheat Code Simply Brilliant

For bulk orders call 1-800-423-8273


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"You're the same today as you'll be in five years except for the people you meet and the books you read."
— Charlie "Tremendous" Jones


Posted by Michael McKinney at 07:02 PM
| Comments (0) | Books

08.31.16

LeadershipNow 140: August 2016 Compilation

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Posted by Michael McKinney at 12:01 PM
| Comments (0) | LeadershipNow 140

08.01.16

First Look: Leadership Books for August 2016

Here's a look at some of the best leadership books to be released in August.

  Stop Spending, Start Managing: Strategies to Transform Wasteful Habits by Tanya Menon and Leigh Thompson
  Nimble, Focused, Feisty: Organizational Cultures That Win in the New Era and How to Create Them by Sara Roberts
  Unmistakable: Why Only Is Better Than Best by Srinivas Rao
  Head Ball Coach: My Life in Football, Doing It Differently—and Winning by Steve Spurrier with Buddy Martin
  The Start-Up J Curve: The Six Steps to Entrepreneurial Success by Howard Love

Stop Spending Nimble, Focused, Feisty Unmistakable Head Ball Coach Start-Up J Curve

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Build your leadership library with these specials on over 100 titles. All titles are at least 40% off the list price and are available only in limited quantities.


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"The habit of reading is the only enjoyment in which there is no alloy; it lasts when all other pleasures fade."
— Anthony Trollope


Posted by Michael McKinney at 11:13 AM
| Comments (0) | Books

07.31.16

LeadershipNow 140: July 2016 Compilation

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Posted by Michael McKinney at 11:27 PM
| Comments (0) | LeadershipNow 140

07.25.16

Under New Management

Under New Management

It is hard to let go of the thinking behind some of the management tools we still use today. Designed for types of work that are no longer prevalent, these systems were designed for another time.

David Burkus reports on a number of seemingly radical management ideas in Under New Management. He stresses that we look for the practices that are limiting employees’ potential and eliminating them. He questions best practices like:

Banning or limiting access to e-mail actually improves productivity. “Researchers believe that limiting email decreases stress and increases productivity because it cuts back on multitasking and distraction.” Consideration should also be given to limiting email to normal working hours.

the customer always come first? Putting employees first may be the best way to serve the needs of the customer. “Profits are driven by customer loyalty, customer loyalty is driven by employee satisfaction, and employee satisfaction is driven by putting employees first.”

As an artifact of the industrial age when managers needed to ensure that all shifts were covered, strict vacation policies were a necessity. But as industrial work gives way to knowledge work more liberal vacation policies often increase engagement and performance. “When you give employees trust and freedom to act responsibly, you don’t need nearly as many policies.” Trust allows employees to focus on performance. In one study, being trusted increased levels of oxytocin (the bonding hormone that creates a feeling of well-being) in the brain which in turn triggers more generous and trusting responses. “Trust breeds more trustworthy behavior.” Burkus also discusses the value of sabbaticals and pre-cations.

People don’t feel comfortable talking about salary. Should how much employees are paid be public knowledge? Some research says yes. “When people know where they stand, and know how to move up in the range, they’re more motivated to work to improve their performance and improve their standing.” But while it can improve perceptions of fairness and feelings of engagement there are obvious drawbacks.

Without non-compete agreements organizations have little incentive to invest in employees or innovative research since they could easily leave and take their knowledge to a rival company. But research has demonstrated that non-compete agreements create a “brain drain” from those states that enforce them. For companies in stats without non-competes, when an employee leaves one firm for another, both companies benefit. Not only do both companies gain new knowledge but new connections between employees in both firms are created. “In effect, departing employees have a cross-pollinating effect on the ideas of both organizations.”

Burkus makes a case for ditching performance appraisals, paying people to quit, bringing in teams to the make hiring decisions, ever changing org charts, and closing open offices.

He also tackles the question: Are managers necessary? Although some reseach suggests that employees are more productive and engaged when they, and not their manager, control their destiny, these are not really mutually exclusive. Nevertheless, Burkus concludes, “To benefit from the motivating power of autonomy, leaders don’t need to give up total control and fire all the managers, but every leader does need to consider how their current structure might be limiting the perception of freedom and blocking the organization from its peak potential.”

Under New Management gives leaders much to think about. Read the research and the stories of those doing it and you decide.

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Posted by Michael McKinney at 10:27 PM
| Comments (0) | Management

07.01.16

First Look: Leadership Books for July 2016

Here's a look at some of the best leadership books to be released in July.

  Preston Tucker and His Battle to Build the Car of Tomorrow by Steve Lehto
  The Effective Manager by Mark Horstman
  Hooked: Why cute sells...and other marketing magic that we just can't resist by Patrick Fagan
  High-Hanging Fruit: Build Something Great by Going Where No One Else Will by Mark Rampolla
  Great Teams: 16 Things High Performing Organizations Do Differently by Don Yaeger

Preston Tucker Effective Manager Hooked 64 Shots Pathways to Possibility

For bulk orders call 1-800-423-8273


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Build your leadership library with these specials on over 100 titles. All titles are at least 40% off the list price and are available only in limited quantities.


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"Wear the old coat and buy the new book."
— Austin Phelps


Posted by Michael McKinney at 06:43 PM
| Comments (0) | Books

06.30.16

LeadershipNow 140: June 2016 Compilation

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Posted by Michael McKinney at 09:55 PM
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